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Chambar Restaurant at 568 Beatty Street, Vancouver has just joined the program.  Aside from being one of our favourite Vancouver restaurants, they’re now feeding our supply chain as well as our appetites! Glad to have them aboard.
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Ashlee Parras used her recycled corks to fill different height glass cylinders and perched LED 'tea lights' on top of them. Stylishly simple! Thanks for sharing Ashlee.
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To date, you have helped us divert over 48,000 wine corks from the solid waste stream. That’s over 48 cubic feet of perfectly reusable cork. Thanks!
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We would like to welcome Burdock & Co as the newest participant. Their exceptional wine list is a perfect complement to their great menu. Burdock & Co. serves refined dishes crafted from organic ingredients.
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It’s difficult to keep up with the product ideas coming from Raelene Rozander’s Creative Corkworks. Raelene’s products can be found in a few wineries and a campground in Summerland BC; the Penticton Wine & Tourism Center; and the Penticton Art Gallery.
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Vancouver Island crafter, Raelene Rozander, is making these great coasters from our recycled wine corks.
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Vancouver crafter, Annie Vandergaag, is passionate about her craft. So it's little wonder that she puts her heart into her work.
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Now you can buy boxes of 100 or boxes of 1,000 recycled wine corks on-line for delivery to Canadian destinations. We can also ship to destinations outside Canada. Please email us to make arrangements.
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We want to welcome Summerhill Pyramid Winery in Kelowna as our most recent participant in our wine cork recycling program. Previously our northern-most location was the Vinegar Works in Summerland. Now all you Kelowna wine lovers can return all those corks you’ve been saving much closer to home. And, since you’re already at a great...
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Great video clearly shows the harvesting process. Cork trees are first harvested when they are about 20 years old. They can be reharvested every nine years or so. In this video you’ll see workers painting a large white “9” on the trunk after the bark has been stripped. This is the year (2009) that the...
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